CALL FOR PAPERS

T01P13 / Transnational Policy Process

Topic : T01 / POLICY PROCESS THEORIES

Policy Process is related to the “interactions that occur over time between public policies and surrounding actors, events, contexts, and outcomes” (Weible 2018, 2). In the 21st century, policymaking processes have increasingly become transnational (Stone, Moloney 2019). The study of “transnational policy processes” is related to a broader phenomenon than policy transfers. It encompasses different forms of global (Stone, Moloney 2019), international (Petiteville, Smith 2006) and foreign (Morin, Paquin 2018) policy processes. As examples we can take the processes of internationalization of domestic best practices (e.g., Bogotá ciclovía, Participatory Budgeting from Porto Alegre, Mexican Oportunidades), the localization of global policies (e.g., the New Urban Agenda, Sendai Framework, Addis Ababa Action Agenda), the development of bottom-up civil society led policy instruments (e.g. Family Farming Policies in Latin America), the implementation of projects by international organizations (e.g., the World Bank, the Interamerican Development Bank, European Union), the functioning of multi-stakeholder partnerships and Global Programmes (e.g. on Cybercrime, or Ending Child Marriage), the international (un)coordination for responses to crises (e.g., the WHO role in Covid-19, foreign aid assistance for the War on Ukraine), the evaluation of peacekeeping operations, setting global agendas (such as the SDGs or the Paris Agreement), etc. These are only a few of the current examples of public policy processes involving a transnational dimension.

The panel continues a discussion that will take place at the Conference On Policy Process Research to be held in Denver and we expect to compile a special issue from papers submitted to the panel.

– We invite papers which explore the panel’s overarching questions from a theoretical, methodological, and empirical perspective.

– We welcome innovative and interdisciplinary papers from a range of different disciplines including political science, sociology, international relations, political geography, political demography to understand the transnational policy processes.

– To be selected, the papers will need to focus on the transnational dimensions of policy process.
– The panel will have Diane Stone (European University Institute) and Leslie Pal (Hamad Bin Khalifa University).

T01P13 / Transnational Policy Process

Topic : T01 / POLICY PROCESS THEORIES

Chair : Osmany Porto de Oliveira (Department of International Relations – Federal University of São Paulo)

Second Chair : Cecilia Osorio Gonnet (Universidad de Chile)

Third Chair : Laura Rahm (University of Toronto)

Fourth Chair : Raul Pacheco-Vega (Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas (CIDE)

GENERAL OBJECTIVES, RESEARCH QUESTIONS AND SCIENTIFIC RELEVANCE

Policy Process is related to the “interactions that occur over time between public policies and surrounding actors, events, contexts, and outcomes” (Weible 2018, 2). In the 21st century, policymaking processes have increasingly become transnational (Stone, Moloney 2019). However, mainstream policy process theories have traditionally focused on domestic policy change, with a few exceptions, in particular from the field of policy transfer. With the growth of agents, such as international development agencies and multi-stakeholder partnerships fueling transfers across governance levels, policy sectors, agents actors, and networks, this area expanded vertiginously in the past years (Dolowitz, Marsh 2000; Hadjiisky, Pal Walker, 2017; Porto de Oliveira 2021).

The study of “transnational policy processes”, however, is related to a broader phenomenon than policy transfers. It encompasses different forms of global (Stone, Moloney 2019), international (Petiteville, Smith 2006) and foreign (Morin, Paquin 2018) policy processes and practices. As examples we can take the processes of internationalization of domestic best practices (e.g., Mexican Oportunidades), the localization of global policies (e.g., the Sendai Framework), the development of bottom-up civil society led policy instruments, the implementation of projects by international organizations (e.g., the World Bank), the circulation of knowledge and ideas (e.g., far-right strategies of political campaign), the coordination of national responses to crises (e.g., the WHO role in Covid-19), the evaluation of peacekeeping operations, setting global agendas (such as the SDGs or the Paris Agreement), etc. These are only a few of the current examples of public policy processes involving a transnational dimension.

The Panel seeks to advance scholarship on the transnational dimensions of policy process, transcending the policy transfer literature. We expect to provide answers to the following questions: How can transnational policy process be defined? Which theories and concepts are useful in analyzing transnational dimensions in policy making? What are the conceptual challenges in capturing multilevel, multinational, multi-actor processes? Which methodological approaches can be applied to assess policy processes beyond the nation state? Which empirical evidence (from Global South or North) can be used in such studies? Are ideas of the public sphere, citizenship/community or political identity altered and shaped by the transnational policy?

References:

Dolowitz, David P., and David Marsh. “Learning from Abroad: The Role of Policy Transfer in Contemporary Policy-Making.” Governance 13, no. 1 (January 2000): 5–23.

Hadjiisky, Magdaléna, Leslie A. Pal, e Christopher Walker. Public Policy Transfer: Micro-Dynamics and Macro-Effects. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2017.

Morin, Jean-Frédéric, e Jonathan Paquin. Foreign Policy Analysis: A Toolbox. 1st edition. New York, NY: Palgrave, 2018.

Petiteville, Franck, e Andy Smith. “Analyser les politiques publiques internationales”. Revue française de science politique 56, no 3 (2006): 357.

Porto de Oliveira, Osmany, ed. Handbook of Policy Transfer, Diffusion and Circulation. Handbooks of Research on Public Policy. Cheltenham, UK; Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2021.

Stone, Diane, and Kim Moloney, eds. The Oxford Handbook of Global Policy and Transnational Administration. First Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019.

Weible, Christopher. “Introduction: The Scope and Focus of Policy Process Research and Theory.” In Theories of the Policy Process, edited by Christopher Weible and Paul Sabatier, 4th ed., 1–13. New York, USA: Routledge, 2018.

To submit a paper for this panel, click here:

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